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BITCHFEST -- THE EXTREMISTS ON THE FAR LEFT AND FAR RIGHT
#61
This white nationalist asshole is Jacob Scott Goodwin, 23.

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He was just found guilty of felony malicious wrong-doing and is looking at 10 years in prison.

Goodwin was one of the extremists who attended the Unite The Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia last August.

Counter-protestor Heather Heyer was run down and killed by another white nationalist at the same rally.

Goodwin, who was carrying a shield and wearing a helmet, led four of his friends in beating the shit out of a black counter-protester named DeAndre Harris in a parking garage at the rally site. It was all caught on tape.

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#62
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^ Harris was left severely injured with a spinal injury, broken arm and head lacerations that required eight staples.

When the white nationalists were confronted by police, Goodwin claimed that he was only acting in self-defense because Harris had assaulted him first. Goodwin filed a complaint against Harris.

However, Harris was found not guilty of wrong-doing in March. He said he was acting in defense of himself and his friend; the judge said it was obvious he wasn't assaulting Goodwin.

Refs:
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-43437521
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-...z5EMsp5q00
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#63
Protesters can get a bit rambunctious it seems. I wouldn't go within 10 miles of one of those things.
You couldn't get a clue during the clue mating season in a field full of horny clues if you smeared your body with clue musk and did the clue mating dance.
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#64
(05-02-2018, 02:00 PM)HairOfTheDog Wrote: looking at 10 years in prison.


Good! I hope every single moment of it is misery.
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#65
Maxine Waters told Kanye West he was talking out of turn. That weirdo will find out real soon what happens to people that stray off the plantation.
You couldn't get a clue during the clue mating season in a field full of horny clues if you smeared your body with clue musk and did the clue mating dance.
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#66
Head wounds bleed A LOT, that's a scratch.
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#67
(05-02-2018, 04:55 PM)BigMark Wrote: Head wounds bleed A LOT, that's a scratch.

Sounds like you have a head injury Biggie, the non-bleeding internal type.

Unfortunately, staples can't treat what's wrong with your head.

The man took a beating which left him with a broken arm, a spinal injury, and head lacerations which required 8 staples (which is obviously more than 'a scratch').
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#68
He got what he deserved.
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#69
(05-02-2018, 06:07 PM)BigMark Wrote: He got what he deserved.


What did he do to deserve that beating?
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#70
He hit someone with a big ass maglite and he didn't let them protest as was their right.
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#71
(05-02-2018, 06:07 PM)BigMark Wrote: He got what he deserved.

Yeah, that's what I figured you meant when you tried to minimize his injuries with an obvious lie. Meh, it's not at all surprising you feel that way.
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#72
It was an exaggeration.
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#73
Follow-Up to Posts 56 & 57

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I really hope vile Alex Jones is found guilty and has to pay the families of his victims for the harm and pain he and his dipshit followers have inflicted upon them for years.  

While I fully support free speech, even when I don't like the content, I also strongly support laws that penalize people who hide behind the First Amendment to profit from spreading malicious bullshit which endangerss and causes harm to others (especially to others who have lost their children to violence).  

Jones in the worst and the people who believe the shit that he peddles are hateful morons.
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#74
The latest:

Snip
In the five years since Noah Pozner was killed at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., death threats and online harassment have forced his parents, Veronique De La Rosa and Leonard Pozner, to relocate seven times. They now live in a high-security community hundreds of miles from where their 6-year-old is buried.

“I would love to go see my son’s grave and I don’t get to do that, but we made the right decision,” Ms. De La Rosa said in a recent interview. Each time they have moved, online fabulists stalking the family have published their whereabouts. “With the speed of light,” she said. “They have their own community, and they have the ear of some very powerful people.”

On Wednesday in an Austin courtroom, the struggle of the Sandy Hook families to hold to account Alex Jones, a powerful leader of this online community, will reach a crossroads. Lawyers for Noah Pozner’s parents will seek to convince a Texas judge that they — and by extension the families of eight other victims in the 2012 shooting that killed 20 first graders and six adults — have a valid defamation claim against Mr. Jones, whose Austin-based Infowars media operation spread false claims that the shooting was an elaborate hoax.

The day after the Pozner case, in the same courthouse, is a hearing in a separate defamation case against Mr. Jones brought by Marcel Fontaine, who was falsely identified on Infowars’ website as the gunman in the Parkland, Fla., school shooting in February. Mr. Fontaine, who lives in Massachusetts, has never visited Florida. The Pozner family and Mr. Fontaine are being represented by Mark Bankston of Farrar & Ball, a law firm based in Houston.

Mr. Jones gained a national spotlight and millions of followers after Donald J. Trump appeared on his show during the campaign, praising his reputation as “amazing.” Since then, many of Mr. Jones’s bogus theories have targeted President Trump’s perceived adversaries and reflect opinions held by his political base.

Last week Mr. Jones broadcast a bizarre accusation that Robert S. Mueller III, the special counsel investigating Russian interference in the 2016 election, was involved in a child sex ring. In an online broadcast, Mr. Jones addressed Mr. Mueller while repeatedly imitating firing a handgun, saying: “It’s the real world. Politically. You’re going to get it, or I’m going to die trying.”

Full piece:  https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/31/us/po...v=top-news
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#75
One thing about the extremists groups like Antifa and the KKK and such is that they may only account for say 5000-10000 nationwide. It is such a small amount proportionally to 390 million Americans. Tiny proportion. Hardly worth consideration UNTIL you get a major portion of them.....anywhere. Charlottesville, Berkerley or wherever. I have often wondered how well it would be to invite them all to a major rally get them all in and representing, clear the streets and homes and dropping a couple of bombs on them and whether the cost of damage and such would justify the impact all of these awful people have on the country or whether it would cause their causes to celebrate them as martyrs.
I never used to finish sentences but now....
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#76
(05-02-2018, 06:07 PM)BigMark Wrote: He got what he deserved.

I so hope you are joking. Violence begets violence. It's pure evil.
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#77
QAnon

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Hoping this growing collection of screwball conspiracy theorists doesn't go the way of some of the others who incite violence.

Journalists at Trump's rally in Florida this week noted multiple attendees carrying signs and wearing T-shirts emblazoned with the name "QAnon."  The shirts and signs are references to a conspiracy theory growing increasingly popular among those on the far-right.

So, what is QAnon?  The conspiracy theory centers on a mysterious and anonymous online figure — "Q." According to The Daily Beast, "Q" began posting on anonymous Internet message boards in October 2017. The person or persons behind the "Q" persona claim to possess a top-level security clearance and evidence of a worldwide criminal conspiracy.

QAnon followers insist that  special counsel Robert Mueller isn't actually investigating Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

Rather, they believe that Mueller was appointed by Trump to investigate Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama and other top Democrats, like former Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta. According to posts written by "Q" — dubbed "breadcrumbs" by the theory's followers — even Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., is a target of Mueller's so-called investigation.

These conspiracy theorists believe that Clinton and Obama are in cahoots with Russian President Vladimir Putin. They also suggest that Trump's political foes, along with Hollywood figures and other world leaders, are participants in a global pedophile ring.   78

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#78
"Q" claims the Trump foes are secretly wearing location-tracking ankle monitors, so their whereabouts can be monitored at all times, and that they'll all be sent to prison very soon in an event the theory's followers call "the storm."

That's a reference to Trump's remarks last year, where he warned of "the calm before the storm" during a meeting with military leaders. (The military is also involved in the QAnon theory — according to "Q," the military persuaded Trump to run for president in order to clean up the vast criminal network.)

QAnon isn't the first conspiracy theory to make the jump from the Internet to the real world. As covered upthread, In December 2016, a man fired a rifle inside Washington, D.C.'s Comet Ping Pong pizzeria, citing the baseless "Pizzagate" conspiracy theory that maintains that the restaurant is the center of a child sex ring involving top Democrats, including Clinton and Podesta.

The "Pizzagate" conspiracy theory originated on fringe Internet sites before emerging in the mainstream. With the ever-increasing appearances of "Q"-branded gear at Trump rallies, QAnon may be following the same path.

Full story: https://www.npr.org/2018/08/02/634749387...rump-world
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#79
(08-02-2018, 07:54 PM)HairOfTheDog Wrote: "Q" claims the Trump foes are secretly wearing location-tracking ankle monitors, so their whereabouts can be monitored at all times, and that they'll all be sent to prison very soon in an event the theory's followers call "the storm."

That's a reference to Trump's remarks last year, where he warned of "the calm before the storm" during a meeting with military leaders. (The military is also involved in the QAnon theory — according to "Q," the military persuaded Trump to run for president in order to clean up the vast criminal network.)

QAnon isn't the first conspiracy theory to make the jump from the Internet to the real world. As covered upthread, In December 2016, a man fired a rifle inside Washington, D.C.'s Comet Ping Pong pizzeria, citing the baseless "Pizzagate" conspiracy theory that maintains that the restaurant is the center of a child sex ring involving top Democrats, including Clinton and Podesta.

The "Pizzagate" conspiracy theory originated on fringe Internet sites before emerging in the mainstream. With the ever-increasing appearances of "Q"-branded gear at Trump rallies, QAnon may be following the same path.

Full story:  https://www.npr.org/2018/08/02/634749387...rump-world

HairOfTheDog...I have seen this coming from a lot of U-tubers. Some categorize it as nothing more than a LARP, others seem to think is a secret underground revolution sending cryptic instructions and communications from Q warning in advance about things like the Vegas shooting. Also warning about 'The Deep State'. It certainly has legs now that its maturing.
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#80
Why is Ski still a Noob? You can tell me to mind my own business. I am just asking.
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