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FLU SHOTS
#21
Well if the virus doesn't survive well in the cold then why is it most prevalent during fall and winter?
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#22
(01-29-2018, 12:30 PM)Blindgreed1 Wrote: Most viruses can't live outside of their host for more than 15 minutes, the longest a virus has ever lived outside of it's host is 24 hours.


Hi there Love3

Please note I gave flowers first.

I feel argumentative about the shelf life you gave for viruses. I say that even knowing a bit about what you do. hah

I think germs last longer than 24 hrs., particularly that dreadful norovirus.
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#23
Because everyone is inside infecting each other.(and other things too)
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#24
(01-29-2018, 01:35 PM)Duchess Wrote:
(01-29-2018, 12:30 PM)Blindgreed1 Wrote: Most viruses can't live outside of their host for more than 15 minutes, the longest a virus has ever lived outside of it's host is 24 hours.


Hi there Love3

Please note I gave flowers first.

I feel argumentative about the shelf life you gave for viruses. I say that even knowing a bit about what you do. hah

I think germs last longer than 24 hrs., particularly that dreadful norovirus.
That would be the exception. That shit is like a nuclear virus. I'm talking about your average run of the mill flu and cold viruses. Some believe Noro can live for years in standing water although it hasn't been proven.
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#25
(01-29-2018, 01:05 PM)sally Wrote: Well if the virus doesn't survive well in the cold then why is it most prevalent during fall and winter?
Because when it gets cold people stay inside with each other
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#26
I don't understand that theory because people stay indoors with each other all year. For example in a school setting children spend the same amount of time in the classroom together during winter as they do summer. Minus maybe 30 minutes to an hour for recess inside of a gymnasium instead of outside if it's too cold.But that goes for rainy weather in the spring and summer too. And people who work inside are still going to do their shift inside whether it's cold or hot.

Also in the south it doesn't get that cold and people are still out and about.
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#27
(01-29-2018, 03:42 PM)sally Wrote: I don't understand that theory because people stay indoors with each other all year. For example in a school setting children spend the same amount of time in the classroom together during winter as they do summer. Minus maybe 30 minutes to an hour for recess inside of a gymnasium instead of outside if it's too cold.But that goes for rainy weather in the spring and summer too. And people who work inside are still going to do their shift inside whether it's cold or hot.

Also in the south it doesn't get that cold and people are still out and about.
Children are little sacks of virus for that very reason. If you've ever heard someone say they've never been sick a day in their life they are more than likely single with no kids. hah And southerners like you and I who enjoy very mild winters have the added bonus of snow birds who arrive yearly with their own illness. The gift that keeps on giving.
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#28
Also, children are notorious for spreading their diseases because they don't wash their hands and make poor decisions and/or have bad habits regarding their bodily excretions of the mucus membranes.

I kept that as vanilla as I could for you Duchess
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#29


It's okay, I know poop & snot happens.
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#30
Many germs, bugs, crawly things die in cold temps. They have learned how to survive by laying eggs in the fall and dying. The cold doesn't kill all the bugs and germs but it does get rid of quite a few. The ground around here freezes 6-12 inches down, its not like Florida that has a temperate climate all year. I would think a humid climate is good for germs.
You couldn't get a clue during the clue mating season in a field full of horny clues if you smeared your body with clue musk and did the clue mating dance.
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#31
(01-29-2018, 05:15 PM)Maggot Wrote: Many germs, bugs, crawly things die in cold temps. They have learned how to survive by laying eggs in the fall and dying. The cold doesn't kill all the bugs and germs but it does get rid of quite a few. The ground around here freezes 6-12 inches down, its not like Florida that has a temperate climate all year. I would think a humid climate is good for germs.
"Germs" is such an all inclusive term. Bacteria don't do well in the cold. That's why operating rooms are always cold.
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#32
Also Sally, another reason cold weather is associated with cold and flu season is because people start up their heaters which generally dries out the sinus making it more susceptible to infection.
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#33
Operating rooms are cold becuase it's the only place men have control of the temperature.
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#34
(01-29-2018, 06:54 PM)BigMark Wrote: Operating rooms are cold becuase it's the only place men have control of the temperature.


Why would a man in an operating room be the one to control the temp, mister? Hmmm?
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#35
(01-29-2018, 05:43 PM)Blindgreed1 Wrote: Also Sally, another reason cold weather is associated with cold and flu season is because people start up their heaters which generally dries out the sinus making it more susceptible to infection.

That makes sense to me, also in winter the air tends to be less humid anyway. Your lips get chapped, your nose dries up and your airway becomes cold while outside.

I still don't buy the theory about people being indoors more during winter is what spreads it. I guess if I get really bored I could go research it.
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#36



Wash your hands! Wash your hands! Wash your hands! I'm a complete nutjob about it.
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#37
Because the nurses better listen or else a obedient Filipina will take her place.
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#38
I am sick right now! But I think it was just a cold and not the flu. I did have body aches for 1 night and fever for a day and a half. : (
I did not get the flu shot this year, sounds like it wouldn't have mattered anyway, but normally I would get the flu shot. I got the flu 5 years back and it wasn't pleasant.
Last year I was sick from the end of December until March with a few healthy weeks here and there, it was terrible. I think change in diet and medical staff at the site contributed to it. The previous medical staff wouldn't let people come out of their room and brought them food when they were sick. The new medical staff didn't follow those protocols and everyone was sick most of the winter-it sucked.
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#39
I was burning up and still cold, not a good combo.
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#40
(01-29-2018, 07:09 PM)sally Wrote:
(01-29-2018, 05:43 PM)Blindgreed1 Wrote: Also Sally, another reason cold weather is associated with cold and flu season is because people start up their heaters which generally dries out the sinus making it more susceptible to infection.

That makes sense to me, also in winter the air tends to be less humid anyway. Your lips get chapped, your nose dries up and your airway becomes cold while outside.

I still don't buy the theory about people being indoors more during winter is what spreads it. I guess if I get really bored I could go research it.
Let me save you some time: https://www.scientificamerican.com/artic...e-flu-mos/
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