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DEATH ROW--death penalty in America
#61
"I made a bad decision." How typical. It's all about him, not the man whose life he took. "I,I,I" And he's excited and pleased about all the attention he has gotten because of the anti-death penalty people who, as usual, have swarmed around him.

Murderers should IMO experience revulsion, disgust and condemnation by the community at large as they face their execution. They should daily be reminded of the pain they have caused others, and of how unforgivable their crime was.

Instead, thanks to all the anti-death penalty people, murderers are showered by love and attention, which further diminishes the significance of what they have done in their eyes, and in the eyes of their family and friends.

Taking another person's life, tearing out the hearts of the loved ones they leave behind - that translates in this animal's mind into Oh, "I made a bad decision."
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#62
(03-09-2011, 02:57 PM)Lady Cop Wrote: Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn announced Wednesday that he has signed legislation eliminating the death penalty in his state, more than 10 years after the state halted executions.

The fifteen death row inmates, sentences now commuted to life without parole, are:

Anthony Mertz, for the rape, killing and mutilation of an Eastern Illinois University student.

Ricardo Harris, for killing two Oak Lawn liquor store employees and hurting two people during a robbery.

Teodoro Baez, for killing two people and dismembering their bodies with a sword after a drug dispute.

Cecil Sutherland, for sexually assaulting and killing a 10-year-old Marion County girl.

Andrew Urdiales, for the murder of a 21-year-old Hammond woman.

Joseph Bannister, after conviction for shooting his ex-girlfriend and killing her sister.

Paul Runge, for raping, killing and setting on fire a mother and her 10-year-old daughter.

Dion Banks, for killing a woman during a carjacking.

Daniel Ramsey, after conviction for raping and killing a girl, shooting to death another girl and hurting three other people.

Rodney Adkins, for killing an Oak Park woman after breaking into her home.

Gary Pate, for killing his wife and stepdaughter.

Eric Hanson, for killing his sister and brother-in-law and his parents.

David Damm, for hiring an acquaintance to kill a 13-year-old girl to silence her accusations of sexual abuse.

Brian Dugan, for the kidnapping, rape and murder of a 10-year-old suburban Chicago girl.

Edward Tenney, for killing a 24-year-old Aurora man during a robbery.

For mugshots: http://www.sj-r.com/photo_galleries/x177...ted?foto=0
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#63
A murderer who killed two fathers more than 20 years ago waved goodbye today as he was executed - despite concerns over a state's lethal injection drugs.

Eric John King, 47, was executed in Florence, Arizona, following a 1989 robbery in Phoenix, and will be one of the last to have the three-drug lethal injection.

King smiled at around 30 witnesses as the death chamber’s curtains opened at the state prison, waving his hand underneath a sheet up to his neck. Hibye

He was convicted of fatally shooting security guard Richard Butts and clerk Ron Barman during a $72 robbery in 1989. Both men were married fathers.

King was the first person to be executed in Arizona since last October, although his lawyers were concerned over one of the lethal drugs and doubted his guilt.

He was declared dead 13 minutes after a medical staff member walked into the death chamber and stated he had been sedated, Corrections Director Charles Ryan said.

King’s lawyers literally fought until the death to get his sentence reversed or delayed.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-...z1I7D20yiR


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#64
(03-30-2011, 03:58 PM)Lady Cop Wrote: A murderer who killed two fathers more than 20 years ago waved goodbye today as he was executed -

Bye-Bye ass-clown. Again, I don't know why it takes so long to execute these monsters. The appeals process is ridiculous. At times, punishing people so long afterward makes no sense. It's like waiting a week to discipline your small child after they've screwed up.

We need to introduce punishment that's an actual deterrent.

I say, for sexual predators/monsters that've actually raped/murdered a child, let's say anyone under 21, they get this:

Thrown into a lion/tiger cage/living space at any of the nations' really nice zoos (I'm thinking San Diego zoo). There'll be no way to escape, but they might live awhile, while they're evading the animals. Eventually, however, when the zoo neglects to feed the lions/tigers, the animals will become hungry and will make the said 'monster' their next meal.

And, it should be televised for those who'd like to see it.

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#65
This is going to come as a big shock but I'm not sure I support the death penalty.

I can read some of these stories (and imagine someone hurting/torturing/killing) my child and yep, I want these murderers dead. But that's pretty much revenge. Do I think the state/federal government should carry out revenge? Mmmmmmmmmmm, not so sure.

Does the death penalty actually deter violent crime? Dunno and I'm too lazy to google it right now. What costs more to us taxpayers, sentencing someone to LWOP or putting them on deathrow? Again, there's debate about that. Finally, I think since the 1970's when capital punishment was reinstated, 138 people who were ON deathrow were exonerated of their crimes. Troubling.

If I knew for a fact that it was reducing violent crime, didn't cost us significanlty more than sending someone to prison LWOP and no innocent peoples were be putting to death, I could probably support it.
Commando Cunt Queen
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#66
I don't view the death penalty as revenge.

I see it as the 100% most effective way of the ensuring the offender in question never reoffends.

Murderers do get released/escape and commit more crimes.

You can't reoffend if you're dead.
We need to punish the French, ignore the Germans and forgive the Russians - Condoleezza Rice.
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#67
(03-31-2011, 11:19 AM)Ordinary Peephole Wrote: I see it as the 100% most effective way of the ensuring the offender in question never reoffends.

Murderers do get released/escape and commit more crimes.

True but LWOP ought to be just that and those people convicted of those types of violent crimes ought to be locked up so tight, escapes would be near impossible.

Meh, I don't have a strong opinion about it. But the cost for all the appeals etc. bothers me and on the other hand, if we sped up the process, we run a greater risk of executing someone who might have later been exonerated. Smiley_emoticons_slash
Commando Cunt Queen
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#68
(03-31-2011, 11:19 AM)Ordinary Peephole Wrote: I don't view the death penalty as revenge.

I see it as the 100% most effective way of the ensuring the offender in question never reoffends.

Murderers do get released/escape and commit more crimes.

You can't reoffend if you're dead.

That sums up my opinion, quite nicely.

As to the possibility of "innocents" being put to death . . . I am more concerned about the countless innocents who have lost their lives due to the actions of criminal monsters.

Our judicial system is like prescription drugs . . . the existence of possibility serious and fatal side effects.

I can live with a 1 in 10,000 chance.

And a damn good lawyer.
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#69
(03-31-2011, 04:50 PM)BlueTiki Wrote: Our judicial system is like prescription drugs . . . the existence of possibility serious and fatal side effects.

Dammit.

. . . . the existence of possible . . .

I really need to read my shit, out loud, before posting.

If only I didn't have such a nasally, high-pitched voice.
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#70
On the eve of his execution, a Texas death row is saying that he does not want to be the state’s guinea pig for the use of a new drug for lethal injection.

Cleve Foster, who is accused of murdering Sudanese refugee Nyaneur Pal in 2002, is set to be executed on Tuesday, but he doesn’t want to be the first Texan to be executed with the new drug pentobarbital. 11Signs_173

The Texas Department of Criminal Justice has been unable to find a supplier of sodium thiopental, one of the three drugs it has been using in a lethal chemical mixture used in execute prisoners. Instead the department announced last month it would begin using pentobarbital as a substitute as Oklahoma and Ohio have in executions.

Supplies of sodium thiopental have been dwindling, as the drug is no longer produced in the U.S.


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#71
(03-31-2011, 04:50 PM)BlueTiki Wrote: As to the possibility of "innocents" being put to death . . . I am more concerned about the countless innocents who have lost their lives due to the actions of criminal monsters.

138 people who were on death row have been exonerated since the death penalty was re-instituted. That's a significant number to me. I'd rather lock them up, throw away the key, force them in to hard labor and then *oops* if we find out they were innocent, at least we didn't kill them. That's kinda..irreversible.
Commando Cunt Queen
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#72
wimpy-ass supremes.

Washington (CNN) -- The Supreme Court for the second time this week has stopped a pending execution, giving lawyers for the condemned inmates more time to file their appeals.

The justices Tuesday morning issued an order granting a stay of execution for Cleve Foster, about eight hours before his scheduled lethal injection. The Gulf War veteran was convicted along with another man of the 2002 murder of Nyanuer "Mary" Pal, a Sudanese immigrant he met at a Fort Worth bar.

The court said it needed more time to rule on the inmate's claims of prior ineffective assistance of counsel, and related claims of innocence of the murder. The state has now been given 30 days to respond to Foster's request for a rehearing of his appeals. The high court will then revisit the petition, and could then decide the execution can go forward. The court's brief order noted Justice Antonin Scalia would have denied the stay of execution.

This is the second time Foster, 47, has been granted a reprieve. His scheduled execution was stopped in January after he had already been given his last meal.

It was to be the state's first execution using a new sedative, the first in the lethal drug cocktail. A nationwide shortage of sodium thiopental forced corrections officials to recently announce they would use pentobarbital, a barbiturate that has alternately been used to put animals to sleep.

Foster's lawyers challenged that change, saying Texas foisted the new protocols so late, with little time for legal or medical review.

"I'm enormously relieved on behalf of my client and his family, and I'm glad that the Supreme Court will be looking, at least preliminarily, at the important issues we've raised," Maurie Levin, representing Foster, told CNN. "I'm very relieved Texas will not be going forward in light of all the questions and chaos using their new execution protocol."

Levin said she and her legal team were up late filing their appeals, saying the process was "very emotional." She said she has not been able to contact her client.

A Texas corrections spokeswoman said the change in chemicals was prompted by an expiration date at the end of March for the state's ready supply of sodium thiopental.

Foster's execution was to be one of seven scheduled in Texas through August. Two men had already been executed this year in the nation's busiest execution state.

The justices had also stopped Tuesday's planned execution in Arizona of Daniel Wayne Cook, issuing an order the previous evening.

He was convicted of the 1987 murder/rape/torture of two men. His lawyers had filed appeals similar to Foster's: contesting his earlier legal representation; and contesting the drugs to be used in the lethal injection, claiming they were illegally imported and may be unsafe. Cook now has several more weeks to challenge his capital punishment, and the Supreme Court may not revisit the petition perhaps until the fall.

Arizona officials had executed another inmate last week, and they had also planned on using the anesthetic pentobarbital in future executions.

















































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#73
(04-04-2011, 11:56 PM)username Wrote: 138 people who were on death row have been exonerated since the death penalty was re-instituted.

Their lawyers should be put to death.

And no lawsuits against the state or the feds.

Tiki's law of reciprocity.

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#74
(04-04-2011, 11:56 PM)username Wrote: 138 people who were on death row have been exonerated since the death penalty was re-instituted. That's a significant number to me. I'd rather lock them up, throw away the key, force them in to hard labor and then *oops* if we find out they were innocent, at least we didn't kill them. That's kinda..irreversible.

You can't make an omelette without breaking some eggs (frying innocent people with a mental age of 7).

Smiley_emoticons_biggrinSmiley_emoticons_kotz

I'm for the death penalty but I think the electric chair is too messy, give me a Pierrepoint weighted dead drop hanging any day. Clunk, snap, dead.
We need to punish the French, ignore the Germans and forgive the Russians - Condoleezza Rice.
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#75
Ohio today
AP
LUCASVILLE, Ohio -- Ohio is preparing to execute a man who killed a Cincinnati jailmate over the changing of a TV channel as he awaited sentencing for the aggravated murder of a fellow drug trafficker.

Clarence Carter, 49, is to be executed Tuesday by lethal injection at the Southern Ohio Correctional Facility in Lucasville. He is to be the second inmate killed using the surgical sedative pentobarbital as a standalone execution drug.

Carter is being executed for killing Johnny Allen Jr., 33, who died two weeks after a December 1988 beating in the Hamilton County jail. Investigators said Carter punched, choked, kicked and stomped on Allen. They said the beating lasted a half-hour, with Carter stopping periodically to mop blood off his sneakers.

Inmates said that, days earlier, Carter had punched Allen in the eye when inmates were watching sports on TV and one of the men changed the channel.

Allen was being held on a theft charge. Carter had been convicted of aggravated murder of Michael Hadnot, who Carter described as a fellow drug trafficker. He told the Ohio Parole Board in February that he killed Hadnot over drugs, money and incriminating documents stolen from a drug operation in which both were involved.

Carter spent Monday visiting with his brother, lawyers and two imams, praying and reading the Quran, said Ohio prisons department spokesman Carlo LoParo. He also shaved his head and face, took a nap and wrote, giving the execution team leader five letters to mail Tuesday morning. Among items allowed in his cell were assorted photographs and a skull cap. He showered Tuesday morning but declined breakfast.

LoParo said Carter was calm and had been in good spirits, laughing during Monday visits with his brother and lawyers and at one point saying, "doing good, happy and I'm a smiling."

Carter opted not to have a special meal Monday, but requested and was given dates. He was served the same dinner as the other Lucasville inmates: tuna salad, wheat bread, oven-browned potatoes, turnip greens, an orange and a beverage. LoParo said he broke a fast to eat dates, tuna and bread after sundown.

Carter's brother, nephew and one of his attorneys planned to attend the execution. No one planned to witness on behalf of Allen.

In letters to the parole board, Allen's mother and sister said he was unrecognizable after the beating and never regained consciousness and that he has grandchildren he'll never meet.

Carter's lawyers argued against the execution, claiming Allen's killing was not premeditated, that Allen was a former U.S. Army soldier who likely instigated the fight and that the inmates used as witnesses were unreliable. They said Carter is borderline mentally disabled and that his upbringing was marked by violent role models, including a stepfather who beat him when he stuttered and a cousin who paid him 50 cents to fight other children.



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#76
rest of article at link below.
interesting...the government has effectively halted executions in America, circumventing the Supremes.

FOX
The Obama administration has launched a quiet campaign over the past two months to seize from local officials a key drug used in lethal injections -- part of a spreading investigation that has contributed to a de facto death penalty freeze in several states.

The investigation stems from concerns about the overseas source of the drug, though some question whether those concerns make a handy excuse to slow the pace of executions. The seizures started in Georgia, where the Drug Enforcement Administration in March grabbed their supply of sodium thiopental. From there, the DEA swooped into Tennessee, Kentucky and other states to confiscate their stash, forcing the states to either find an alternative chemical or suspend executions.

"It's very strange," said Kent Scheidegger, legal director with the Criminal Justice Legal Foundation.

Sodium thiopental is just one drug in a three-drug mix used to execute prisoners. It is used as the first drug in the process to induce general anesthesia. The subsequent drugs paralyze and then kill the inmate.

The administration is keeping its probe under wraps. Though the DEA said in March they had "concerns" about the way the drug was imported into the United States, federal officials have since stopped talking about it entirely. The DEA referred questions from FoxNews.com to the Justice Department. A representative at the Justice Department said she could not comment on the case.

State officials confirm the circumstances of the seizures.

Lauren Kane, a spokeswoman with the Georgia attorney general's office, told FoxNews.com officials seized their state supply and that while the justice system can continue to work on death penalty cases, for the time being the executions themselves "cannot be performed."

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2011/05/...z1Lmv3bvy5

















































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#77
Replace with muriatic acid problem solved.
You couldn't get a clue during the clue mating season in a field full of horny clues if you smeared your body with clue musk and did the clue mating dance.
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#78
(05-08-2011, 04:57 PM)Maggot Wrote: Replace with muriatic acid problem solved.


hah I've seen that shit SMOKE.


[Image: Zy3rKpW.png]
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#79
(05-08-2011, 05:21 PM)Duchess Wrote:
(05-08-2011, 04:57 PM)Maggot Wrote: Replace with muriatic acid problem solved.


hah I've seen that shit SMOKE.

I use it sometimes etching gunite and for soldering copper roofs. Nasty stuff.
You couldn't get a clue during the clue mating season in a field full of horny clues if you smeared your body with clue musk and did the clue mating dance.
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#80
all the states are hereby ordered to change their method of execution to that of firing squad.

Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other.
John Adams
















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