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Cases Old and Cold
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Maggot Offline
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Posts: 26,325
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Post: #127
RE: Cases Old and Cold

Yeah it really should be the same as getting fingerprinted.






You couldn't get a clue during the clue mating season in a field full of horny clues if you smeared your body with clue musk and did the clue mating dance.
04-27-2018 12:51 PM
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HairOfTheDog Offline
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Post: #128
RE: Cases Old and Cold

(04-27-2018 12:51 PM)Maggot Wrote:  Yeah it really should be the same as getting fingerprinted.

Unsurprisingly and understandably..................now that it's been revealed LE used DNA from a family tree website database to identify the Golden State Killer, there's a lot of controversy and concern over privacy issues.

When people submit their DNA to Ancestory.com, 123andMe, and other family tree tracing websites, they're potentially opening up themselves and all of their blood relatives to LE searches. Theoretically, LE could just create a fake profile and upload crime scene DNA to get family tree information, which could be an extremely significant lead. However, I don't know if it would be presentable at trial.

In this case, the DNA match to DeAngelo was not found on either of those two popular websites and LE didn't have a warrant for the search. They didn't need one because they used an unadvertised genealogy site called GEDMatch.

The DNA submitted to GEDMatch site is public because users are hoping unknown family members will also submit their DNA online and the GEDMatch site will connect them, and the GEDMatch user agreement stipulates that the samples are publicly available.

But, there's the potential for user-uploaded DNA to be used to discriminate as well (by insurance companies, employers, etc). Some states, like California, already have laws on the book addressing that possible misuse.

Anyway, I understand both sides of the argument regarding LE using non-criminal DNA databases in their investigations.

I believe DNA could grow from being an important tool in solving crimes to also being a significant crime deterrent as criminals and would-be criminals become aware that if they leave behind any crime scene DNA, they can be tracked down if even a very distant relative has uploaded DNA .

I tend to support LE access to genealogy DNA samples, but with restrictions (only for violent crimes and identification of Jane/John Does, etc).

It'll be interesting to watch this justice vs. privacy debate unfold.





04-28-2018 10:24 AM
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HairOfTheDog Offline
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Post: #129
RE: Cases Old and Cold

Can new technology and investigative techniques FINALLY lead to the identity of the Zodiac Killer?

[Image: Zodiac%20Killer_1525373762333.jpg_115553...40_360.jpg]

I've been interested in the Zodiac case since childhood. It's a sad, strange and fascinating case. It would be great to see the killer identified after all these years.

If anyone is interested in the case and hasn't seen it yet, the movie "Zodiac" with Jake Gyllenhaal and Robert Downey Jr. is a really good watch and fairly accurate depiction of the California detectives' failed attempts to positively identify the serial killer.

The Zodiac Killer fatally stabbed or shot to death five people in Northern California in 1968 and 1969, then sent taunting letters and cryptograms to the police and newspapers. The Vallejo police are the lead investigators because the first two victims were killed there.

The suspect was dubbed the Zodiac Killer because some of the cryptograms included astrological symbols and references. Experts and armchair sleuths alike have been trying to fully decipher them for 50 years.

Now, Northern California detectives say they hope to try the same DNA tracing technology recently used to arrest a suspect in another string of cold-case serial slayings — those blamed on the Golden State Killer.

But first they have to get a better DNA profile of the Zodiac Killer. To that end, the Vallejo Police Department sent two letters written by the Zodiac Killer to a private lab several months back. They hope to find the killer's DNA on the back of the stamps or envelope flaps that may have been licked. They are expecting results soon.

Story: http://www.latimes.com/local/california/...story.html





05-04-2018 02:12 PM
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HairOfTheDog Offline
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Post: #130
RE: Cases Old and Cold

Familial DNA Sample Identifies Suspect in 30-year-old Cold Case

The methodology used to identify the suspect in the California 'Golden State Killer' serial murders/rapes is being successfully used in cold case investigations in other states as well.

A suspect was charged last Friday in the following Washington cold case after investigators matched crime scene DNA to a DNA sample uploaded to a genealogy website.

The DNA sample had been uploaded by a distant relative of the suspect who was looking to trace the family tree.

[Image: 052318_TS_genealogy-murderers_feat.jpg]
In 1987, a young Canadian couple, Tanya Van Cuylenborg, 18, (left) and Jay Cook, 20, (right) was killed while on a trip to Seattle. Tanya was raped and shot in the back of the head. Jay was beaten to death with stones.

A Washington state trucker who authorities say was linked by a controversial new DNA technique was charged with two counts of aggravated first-degree murder.

[Image: talbott.jpg?quality=85&strip=all...amp;crop=1]
^ William Earl Talbott II, 55, is the suspect. Investigators worked through family members to eventually get to Talbott.

Talbott pleaded not guilty and is awaiting trial.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/suspect-lin...th-murder/





06-22-2018 05:28 PM
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