Post Reply 
 
Thread Rating:
  • 1 Votes - 4 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Pot Criminalization: Up in Smoke?
Author Message
Duchess Away
Administrator
******

Posts: 62,158
Joined: Jun 2008
Post: #141
RE: Pot Criminalization: Up in Smoke?



DC will be voting on legalizing pot in November. I am astounded.






[Image: Zy3rKpW.png]
08-06-2014 05:00 PM
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply Reply

ramseycat Offline
Mocker
**

Posts: 16,295
Joined: Nov 2008
Post: #142
RE: Pot Criminalization: Up in Smoke?

Wow. Really? I bet it doesn't pass.






Devil Money Stealing Aunt Smiley_emoticons_fies
08-06-2014 06:09 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply Reply

Duchess Away
Administrator
******

Posts: 62,158
Joined: Jun 2008
Post: #143
RE: Pot Criminalization: Up in Smoke?



It's already been decriminalized. Fines that could have been as high as 1000.00 have now been dropped to 25.00 so that's a big step in the right direction.






[Image: Zy3rKpW.png]
08-06-2014 07:05 PM
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply Reply

HairOfTheDog Offline
Moderator
*****

Posts: 25,297
Joined: Aug 2011
Post: #144
RE: Pot Criminalization: Up in Smoke?

PHILADELPHIA FREEDOM

[Image: philly-norml-marijuana.jpg]

It's so encouraging to see DC and Philly moving outta the dark ages on marijuana possession. Way too many people have been jailed and subsequently unable to find employment for carrying a bit of weed, IMO.

Snip:
Philly Mayor Michael Nutter confirmed Monday that he will sign a bill into law that will make his city the largest in America to decriminalize marijuana possession, Philly Mag reports. Essentially it softens the penalty for such an offense from possible jail time to a $25 fine.

Nutter wasn't a fan of the bill in the past, but he told KYW Newsradio that he agreed to sign the bill -- with a caveat -- because he's seen too many of his citizens slapped with charges for small amounts of pot.

"So I think the agreement ends up putting the city and our citizens in a much better place," Nutter told CBS News, noting that signing the bill won't be the same as condoning marijuana use.

Though earlier reports have stated that Nutter would sign the bill this week, it'll likely take another two. He arrived at a compromise with City Councilman Jim Kenney, who originally sponsored the bill in May. Nutter's tweak will tack on a $100 fine for smoking in public, which can be waived with a few hours of public service. Kenney's bill will be amended Thursday by the council and get a final vote two weeks later before it shows up on Nutter's desk again.

Kenney says the amendment is still a whole lot better than Philadelphia's current law, which punishes any marijuana possession with at least a $200 fine, a drug abuse course and an arrest record, according to Mic.


Full story: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/09/08...86848.html





09-09-2014 05:31 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply Reply

Duchess Away
Administrator
******

Posts: 62,158
Joined: Jun 2008
Post: #145
RE: Pot Criminalization: Up in Smoke?



Awesome. Wish my state would follow suit.






[Image: Zy3rKpW.png]
09-09-2014 05:38 PM
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply Reply

HairOfTheDog Offline
Moderator
*****

Posts: 25,297
Joined: Aug 2011
Post: #146
RE: Pot Criminalization: Up in Smoke?

ALASKA BECOMES THIRD STATE TO LEGALIZE MARIJUANA

Ramsey was on the right track in post #9.

Legalizing and taxing marijuana won't take the country out of debt (unless it becomes legal on a federal level at some point), but it can certainly push individual states from deficit to surplus.

Plus, it allows for better allocation of tax dollars that are currently wasted on law enforcement pursuing marijuana arrests and incarcerating those who are convicted.

Snip:

[Image: alaskan-negress.jpg]

Yesterday, Alaska ended prohibition of marijuana in the state, officially putting into effect Ballot Measure 2, approved by 53 percent of state voters in November.

Alaskans age 21 and older may now legally possess up to one ounce of marijuana, grow as many as six marijuana plants in their homes (with no more than three flowering), and possess any additional marijuana produced by those plants.

Shops selling legal recreational marijuana aren't likely to open until 2016, after the state legislature establishes a regulatory framework. State lawmakers have begun introducing legislation to that end.

"State laws allowing adults to use marijuana are becoming less and less of a novelty," said Mason Tvert, communications director for drug policy reform group Marijuana Policy Project. "It won’t be long before it’s the rule instead of the exception nationwide. Colorado and Washington are proving that regulating marijuana works, and soon Alaska will, too.”


Full story: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/02/24...e&ir=Crime





02-25-2015 10:07 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply Reply

Donovan Offline
Clarified idiot
**

Posts: 5,018
Joined: Mar 2012
Post: #147
RE: Pot Criminalization: Up in Smoke?

Now that Colorado has, ummm, blazed the trail so to speak, the other states will topple like dominoes. Not because none of the dire health predictions came true, even though they haven't; but because of that crazy revenue Colorado is raking in. Fucking green gold is what they have.

. Now there's a study that says pot is far and away the least dangerous recreational drug out there. Shocking, said absolutely nobody. Pot heads have been saying booze and cigarettes are way worse for decades now. Only now science is backing them up on it.






Thank god I am oblivious to the opinions of others while caught in the blinding splendor of my own cleverness.
02-25-2015 11:57 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply Reply

Duchess Away
Administrator
******

Posts: 62,158
Joined: Jun 2008
Post: #148
RE: Pot Criminalization: Up in Smoke?



I have never, ever seen anyone high on weed say or do the kinds of things someone who is drunk will say or do.






[Image: Zy3rKpW.png]
02-25-2015 03:03 PM
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply Reply

FAHQTOO Away
Crusty Crab Bitch
**

Posts: 5,365
Joined: Feb 2009
Post: #149
RE: Pot Criminalization: Up in Smoke?

(02-25-2015 03:03 PM)Duchess Wrote:  

I have never, ever seen anyone high on weed say or do the kinds of things someone who is drunk will say or do.

I agree. Booze vs weed is a no comparison. The way I act when I'm drinking is nothing like I act when I'm smoking. I'll take weed over alcohol any day.





02-25-2015 04:46 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply Reply

sally Away
sally
**

Posts: 15,891
Joined: Dec 2008
Post: #150
RE: Pot Criminalization: Up in Smoke?

(02-25-2015 03:03 PM)Duchess Wrote:  

I have never, ever seen anyone high on weed say or do the kinds of things someone who is drunk will say or do.


You never met me. I handle booze way better than pot. If I smoked a joint and you asked me what I was watching on TV I wouldn't be able to tell you.

"Hey Sally, do you know where your kids are?" No, I don't know even know where the fuck I am.





02-25-2015 04:49 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply Reply

sally Away
sally
**

Posts: 15,891
Joined: Dec 2008
Post: #151
RE: Pot Criminalization: Up in Smoke?

I realize that's not the norm, but that's why I don't smoke it.





02-25-2015 04:58 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply Reply

Duchess Away
Administrator
******

Posts: 62,158
Joined: Jun 2008
Post: #152
RE: Pot Criminalization: Up in Smoke?



I get high everyday but I rarely drink. I have an itty bitty wine cellar with many bottles of wine that hardly ever even gets touched.






[Image: Zy3rKpW.png]
02-25-2015 05:16 PM
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply Reply

Duchess Away
Administrator
******

Posts: 62,158
Joined: Jun 2008
Post: #153
RE: Pot Criminalization: Up in Smoke?



Now DC joins the ranks. Sorta never thought this day would come for such a tightassed town.

After months of debate, threats and uncertainty, recreational marijuana became legal in Washington, D.C., Thursday -- at least according to the city government.

Adults 21 and over may now legally use marijuana, possess up to two ounces and grow up to six marijuana plants in their homes for personal use. Marijuana sales remain illegal, but the District Council is considering a bill that would regulate and tax marijuana sales, similar to laws in Colorado and Washington state. Because of the city's unique oversight by Congress, it's unclear if any measure legalizing marijuana sales and regulation could go into effect before 2016.


Story






[Image: Zy3rKpW.png]
02-26-2015 08:04 AM
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply Reply

HairOfTheDog Offline
Moderator
*****

Posts: 25,297
Joined: Aug 2011
Post: #154
RE: Pot Criminalization: Up in Smoke?

IT'S ABOUT TIME -- PROPOSED END TO THE FED'S WAR ON MARIJUANA

[Image: Uncle-Sam.jpg]

This is so long-overdue and such a positive shift in mindset and policy for America, IMO. Since the bill was drafted by two Democrats AND a high-profile Republican, maybe it can even get passed by Congress. God I hope so.

A sweeping Senate bill introduced Tuesday seeks to significantly roll back the federal government's war on medical marijuana.

The Compassionate Access, Research Expansion and Respect States (CARERS) Act, introduced by Sens. Cory Booker (D-N.J.), Rand Paul (R-Ky.) and Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.), seeks to drastically reduce the federal government's ability to crack down on state-legal medical marijuana programs and encourage more research into the plant through several major changes in federal law.

Here are some highlights of the legislation:

Protection From Federal Prosecution: One of the most significant goals of the bill is to allow for patients, doctors and businesses to participate in their states' medical marijuana programs without fear of being prosecuted by the federal government, which continues to ban the substance in all forms. Under this new legislation, the Controlled Substances Act would be amended so that states can set their own medical marijuana policies.

To date, 23 states, along with the District of Columbia, have legalized medical marijuana and 12 others have legalized the limited use of low-THC marijuana for medical purposes. The state laws and people acting in compliance with them would be protected by this bill.

Reclassifying Marijuana As A Less Dangerous Substance:
Under the Controlled Substances Act, the U.S. has five categories for drugs and drug ingredients. Schedule I is reserved for what the Drug Enforcement Administration considers to have the highest potential for abuse and no medical value. Marijuana has been classified as Schedule I for decades, alongside other substances like heroin and LSD.


Financing Reform: Banks Could Work With Medical Marijuana Businesses: Legal marijuana, both medical and recreational, is the fastest-growing industry in the U.S., and the vast majority of the industry's more than $1 billion in annual revenue is brought in by state-legal medical marijuana programs. But because of banks' fears of being implicated as money launderers, marijuana-related businesses are often forced into cash-only transactions, putting retailers' safety at risk and creating problems with taxes and employee payroll. Despite the Treasury Department's 2014 guidance, which supporters hoped would ease interactions, most banks are still extremely wary of working with marijuana businesses since the plant remains illegal under federal law. The legislation would expand banking access for medical marijuana businesses, enabling them to function largely like traditional businesses.

Open Up Avenues For Research On The Plant: Getting the federal government to sign off on a marijuana study is exceedingly difficult, and two of the most stifling federal barriers to marijuana research would be lifted under this new legislation. Currently, all marijuana research must go through a Public Health Service review -- a process established in 1999 by the federal government after a 1998 Institute of Medicine report called for more scientific research into the medical value of marijuana. It's a process that no other Schedule I substance is subject to and one that researchers and lawmakers alike have criticized for thwarting research. That extra step would be removed entirely under the Senate bill.

Easier Access For Veterans: Currently, doctors working under the Department of Veterans Affairs are prohibited from aiding their patients who are seeking medical marijuana, even in states where it is legal. This legislation would lift that ban and allow for VA doctors to recommend medical marijuana to their veteran patients suffering from certain conditions, where it is legal to do so under state law.

The CARERS Act has the support of more than 20 high-profile policy organizations, including the American Civil Liberties Union, Americans for Safe Access, Marijuana Policy Project, Drug Policy Alliance, Law Enforcement Against Prohibition and Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies.

Full piece: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/03/10...36482.html





03-10-2015 02:46 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply Reply

Post Reply