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Pot Criminalization: Up in Smoke?
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Maggot Offline
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Post: #155
RE: Pot Criminalization: Up in Smoke?

I've always thought it should be sold in liquor stores like booze and treated as such. It could pay for Obamacare.






03-10-2015 04:16 PM
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FAHQTOO Away
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Post: #156
RE: Pot Criminalization: Up in Smoke?

(03-10-2015 02:46 PM)HairOfTheDog Wrote:  IT'S ABOUT TIME -- PROPOSED END TO THE FED'S WAR ON MARIJUANA

[Image: Uncle-Sam.jpg]

This is so long-overdue and such a positive shift in mindset and policy for America, IMO. Since the bill was drafted by two Democrats AND a high-profile Republican, maybe it can even get passed by Congress. God I hope so.

A sweeping Senate bill introduced Tuesday seeks to significantly roll back the federal government's war on medical marijuana.

The Compassionate Access, Research Expansion and Respect States (CARERS) Act, introduced by Sens. Cory Booker (D-N.J.), Rand Paul (R-Ky.) and Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.), seeks to drastically reduce the federal government's ability to crack down on state-legal medical marijuana programs and encourage more research into the plant through several major changes in federal law.

Here are some highlights of the legislation:

Protection From Federal Prosecution: One of the most significant goals of the bill is to allow for patients, doctors and businesses to participate in their states' medical marijuana programs without fear of being prosecuted by the federal government, which continues to ban the substance in all forms. Under this new legislation, the Controlled Substances Act would be amended so that states can set their own medical marijuana policies.

To date, 23 states, along with the District of Columbia, have legalized medical marijuana and 12 others have legalized the limited use of low-THC marijuana for medical purposes. The state laws and people acting in compliance with them would be protected by this bill.

Reclassifying Marijuana As A Less Dangerous Substance:
Under the Controlled Substances Act, the U.S. has five categories for drugs and drug ingredients. Schedule I is reserved for what the Drug Enforcement Administration considers to have the highest potential for abuse and no medical value. Marijuana has been classified as Schedule I for decades, alongside other substances like heroin and LSD.


Financing Reform: Banks Could Work With Medical Marijuana Businesses: Legal marijuana, both medical and recreational, is the fastest-growing industry in the U.S., and the vast majority of the industry's more than $1 billion in annual revenue is brought in by state-legal medical marijuana programs. But because of banks' fears of being implicated as money launderers, marijuana-related businesses are often forced into cash-only transactions, putting retailers' safety at risk and creating problems with taxes and employee payroll. Despite the Treasury Department's 2014 guidance, which supporters hoped would ease interactions, most banks are still extremely wary of working with marijuana businesses since the plant remains illegal under federal law. The legislation would expand banking access for medical marijuana businesses, enabling them to function largely like traditional businesses.

Open Up Avenues For Research On The Plant: Getting the federal government to sign off on a marijuana study is exceedingly difficult, and two of the most stifling federal barriers to marijuana research would be lifted under this new legislation. Currently, all marijuana research must go through a Public Health Service review -- a process established in 1999 by the federal government after a 1998 Institute of Medicine report called for more scientific research into the medical value of marijuana. It's a process that no other Schedule I substance is subject to and one that researchers and lawmakers alike have criticized for thwarting research. That extra step would be removed entirely under the Senate bill.

Easier Access For Veterans: Currently, doctors working under the Department of Veterans Affairs are prohibited from aiding their patients who are seeking medical marijuana, even in states where it is legal. This legislation would lift that ban and allow for VA doctors to recommend medical marijuana to their veteran patients suffering from certain conditions, where it is legal to do so under state law.

The CARERS Act has the support of more than 20 high-profile policy organizations, including the American Civil Liberties Union, Americans for Safe Access, Marijuana Policy Project, Drug Policy Alliance, Law Enforcement Against Prohibition and Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies.

Full piece: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/03/10...36482.html

Respect-applause





03-10-2015 04:31 PM
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Maggot Offline
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Post: #157
RE: Pot Criminalization: Up in Smoke?









06-01-2015 01:20 PM
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HairOfTheDog Offline
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Post: #158
RE: Pot Criminalization: Up in Smoke?

RECREATIONAL MARIJUANA -- SHOW ME THE $$$$

Washington state raked in more than $70 million in taxes on $274 million is sales during its first year of legal and regulated marijuana (2014), double the forecast.

In the first year of legalization, Washington state's marijuana businesses sold more than 22,000 pounds of marijuana and 700,000 marijuana-infused edible products, including both solids and liquids. Meanwhile, state cultivators harvested nearly 60,000 pounds of marijuana flower.

Washington state has approved more than 6 million square feet of plant canopy to produce marijuana to date, according to Brian Smith, the communications director for the state Liquor Control Board.

Colorado raked in $44 million in taxes off of $386 million in sales during its first of legal and regulated marijuana (2013), vastly exceeding the forecast. Last year, those numbers doubled.

Besides Washington and Colorado, two more states -- Oregon and Alaska -- as well as the District of Columbia have legalized marijuana for recreational purposes. While Oregon's new law went into effect just last week and Alaska's went into effect in February, the first shops in both states aren't expected to open until 2016.

That's a lot of tax revenue slated for schools, healthcare and road repair.

"These impressive numbers are likely to catch the eyes of policymakers in other states that could use a little help closing their budget gaps," said Tom Angell, chairman of the advocacy group Marijuana Majority.

Legal marijuana is the fastest-growing industry in the United States, a recent industry report found, and if the trend toward legalization spreads to all 50 states, marijuana could become larger than the organic food industry.

Marijuana remains illegal under federal law.


Refs:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/07/06...37722.html
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonk...n-by-2016/





07-06-2015 08:04 PM
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HairOfTheDog Offline
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Post: #159
RE: Pot Criminalization: Up in Smoke?

Mizanskey Walks Free

[Image: parole24n-3-web.jpg]

The release of Jeff Mizanskey from a Jefferson City, Missouri, Correctional Center followed years of lobbying from family, lawmakers and advocates for the legalization of marijuana.

Mizanskey was sentenced to Life with Parole in 1996 after police said he conspired to sell 6 pounds of marijuana to a dealer connected to Mexican drug cartels. The life with no parole sentence was allowed under a Missouri law for persistent drug offenders; Mizanskey already had two drug convictions — one for possession and sale of marijuana in 1984 and another for possession in 1991.

Mizanskey was the only Missouri inmate serving such a sentence for a nonviolent marijuana-related offense when Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon agreed in May to commute his sentence. Nixon's action allowed Mizanskey to argue for his freedom.

Nixon cited Mizanskey's nonviolent record, noting that none of his offenses involved selling drugs to children. The law under which he was originally sentenced has since been changed.

Other states are reevaluating punishments for drug-possession crimes, largely motivated by the high cost of imprisoning low-level, nonviolent offenders.

In Connecticut, a new law will make possession of small amounts of hard drugs, including heroin, cocaine and crack cocaine, a misdemeanor for a first-time offense, rather than allowing for the current maximum seven-year prison sentence. Nebraska and Alabama expect to save hundreds of millions of dollars by cutting down on the number of offenders locked up for possessing small amounts of drugs under new laws.

Source: http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/miss...ks-n419376
------------------------------

I'm glad to see Mizanskey walk free, and to see non-violent possession charges downgraded to misdemeanors, decriminalized, or legalized across the country -- in relation to marijuana, at least.





09-01-2015 11:31 AM
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Jimbone Offline
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Post: #160
RE: Pot Criminalization: Up in Smoke?

You'd think he'd look happier about it.





09-01-2015 11:46 AM
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Donovan Offline
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Post: #161
RE: Pot Criminalization: Up in Smoke?

I dunno, if I'd just spent two fucking decades in jail for selling weed I might have trouble finding my happy place too.






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09-01-2015 11:52 AM
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Jimbone Offline
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Post: #162
RE: Pot Criminalization: Up in Smoke?

I don't know... those guys who get released after decades for murders they didn't commit seem downright giddy.

This guy is too glum. He needs to spark one up and relax. hah





09-01-2015 12:10 PM
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Donovan Offline
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Post: #163
RE: Pot Criminalization: Up in Smoke?

Maybe he's pissed because they let him out on a Monday and Tuesday is taco night.






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09-01-2015 01:09 PM
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Duchess Away
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Post: #164
RE: Pot Criminalization: Up in Smoke?



Life without parole for selling weed. Jesus Christ. I've seen a lot of murderers do less time than that. I'm glad he's free.






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09-01-2015 01:16 PM
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Maggot Offline
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Post: #165
RE: Pot Criminalization: Up in Smoke?

Why would anyone be selling drugs to a drug cartel? Don't they have their own stuff?






09-01-2015 01:19 PM
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BlueTiki Offline
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Post: #166
RE: Pot Criminalization: Up in Smoke?

I guess Nixon feels it's OK to rip a fetus, from a sixteen year old (without parental consent) but not to sell them a fattie.





09-01-2015 01:52 PM
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Blindgreed1 Offline
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RE: Pot Criminalization: Up in Smoke?

(09-01-2015 01:52 PM)BlueTiki Wrote:  I guess Nixon feels it's OK to rip a fetus, from a sixteen year old (without parental consent) but not to sell them a fattie.
Nixon was in the generation of that ridiculous "Killer Weed" era. If I recall, murder and communism was the main focus of that "educational" movie.





09-01-2015 01:58 PM
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BlueTiki Offline
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Post: #168
RE: Pot Criminalization: Up in Smoke?

Sorry . . . Jay, not Dick.

Governor Jay Nixon.





09-01-2015 02:03 PM
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