Thread Rating:
  • 1 Vote(s) - 3 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
BOOKS! - what are you reading?
#21
"PILLARS OF THE EARTH"

has anyone read this 1989 book? it's been revived with a Showtime series soon to be out on DVD. i haven't seen it yet, but the book was an excellent read! it's historical fiction about the building of a 12th century cathedral. sounds boring, but it's not. you can still get the book on amazon in hardcover, paperback or kindle.


Attached Files Thumbnail(s)
   

.gif   books.gif (Size: 9.61 KB / Downloads: 62)

















































Reply
#22
The End of Faith by my hero, Sam Harris.

[Image: end-of-faith.jpg]
86 112
Reply
#23


Jeezus. I'm not reading anything deep like you guys are. I'm just finishing Jonathan Kellerman's "Over The Edge". I read Harlan Coben's, "Caught" over the weekend. It rained pretty much all day Sunday so, the only thing I was compelled to do was curl up in a chair in my pretty office & read and hangout online.
[Image: Zy3rKpW.png]
Reply
#24
(08-17-2010, 08:31 AM)Lady Cop Wrote: " you can still get the book on amazon in hardcover, paperback or kindle.

..and a shed-load more in bit-torrent!
Reply
#25
from the MAIL...stunning! the most expensive book in the world~~~

whoever manages to snag this book - to be auctioned at Sotheby's this year - will certainly have something to crow about.
Birds of paradise: John James Audubon's Birds of America features full scale paintings of various species

valued at £6million 'Birds of America' is the most expensive page-turner in the world and one of only 119 copies ever printed.
Written and illustrated by John James Audubon, the book was a labour of love that has become a literary treasure for collectors.

The Haiti-born naturalist and artist would hunt the featured birds during the day and then complete full scale paintings of the birds at night.
In 1826 he took his work to Liverpool where it was then turned into the book now known as Birds of America.
His book was so widely regarded in his day - he died in 1851 - that it was mentioned in Charles Darwin's On The Origin Of Species.




Attached Files Thumbnail(s)
               

















































Reply
#26
Kewlpics
I would like a new sig line, but am not sure what it should be. So I will just put a tag that says "This space for rent"
Reply
#27
   
Do unto others then run like hell! 104 ::devilban::
Reply
#28
i just looked up a review of that book "The Cruelest Miles" and knew it was a perfect gift for my brother's wife who visits Alaska every year to hike and look for wolves, and is a dog lover and trainer. she will enjoy it i am sure!
i really like books as gifts when you know someone's interests. Smiley_emoticons_smile



















































Reply
#29
(09-11-2010, 10:04 PM)Lady Cop Wrote: i just looked up a review of that book "The Cruelest Miles" and knew it was a perfect gift for my brother's wife who visits Alaska every year to hike and look for wolves, and is a dog lover and trainer. she will enjoy it i am sure!
i really like books as gifts when you know someone's interests. Smiley_emoticons_smile

Sorry for being such a slacker and not putting a review earlier:

"In 1925, a deadly diphtheria epidemic swept through icebound Nome, Alaska. The life-saving serum was a thousand miles away, and a blizzard was brewing. Airplanes could not fly in such conditions: only the dogs could do it. Racing against death, twenty dog teams relayed the serum across the Alaskan wilderness as newspapers nationwide headlined the drama, enthralling an entire generation. The heroic dash to Nome inspired the annual Iditarod Dog Sled Race in Alaska and immortalized Balto, the lead dog whose arrival in Nome over a snow-blown trail was an American legend in the making. His bronze statue still stands in New York City's Central Park, in dedication to the "Endurance, Fidelity and Intelligence" of the dogs that saved Nome. This is their story, the greatest dog story never fully told, until now." http://laneysalisbury.com/TheCruelestMiles.html
   
Do unto others then run like hell! 104 ::devilban::
Reply
#30


I just started reading Jodi Picoult's, "House Rules". I hope it's interesting, it's a big book and I'm only a few pages into it.
[Image: Zy3rKpW.png]
Reply
#31
This is the last book I read, I would suggest reading it to everyone.


ONE SECOND AFTER.




One Second After is a 2009 novel by American writer William R. Forstchen. The novel deals with an unexpected electromagnetic pulse attack on the United States as it affects the people living in and around the town of Black Mountain, North Carolina.
Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other.
John Adams
















Reply
#32
Audubon made his book large like that to present the birds lifesize. Many of the pictures in the book were cut out and displayed in relatives houses. Today even one print from the book can fetch 20,000.00.
You couldn't get a clue during the clue mating season in a field full of horny clues if you smeared your body with clue musk and did the clue mating dance.
Reply
#33
(09-12-2010, 08:34 AM)IMaDick Wrote: This is the last book I read, I would suggest reading it to everyone.


ONE SECOND AFTER.


I just put a request in for at my libraries website.


[Image: Zy3rKpW.png]
Reply
#34
EMP attack is the wave of the present.
Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other.
John Adams
















Reply
#35
WHOA! Oscar Wilde's letters to be released~~what a brilliant wit, imprisoned and hounded out of England for being a queer.

Oscar Wilde love letters discovered

A collection of affectionate letters written by Oscar Wilde to a young male magazine editor have been revealed for the first time.

15 Sep 2010

Penned in his own hand, the revealing letters appear to show the poet struggling with his homosexuality at a time when it was punishable by prison.

In one he muses: "This is all wrong isn't it."

The intriguing collection is now expected to fetch £10,000 or more when it goes to auction later this month.

During his time writing and editing for Society Magazines in London Wilde wrote a series of letters in 1887 to fellow editor Alsager Vian inviting him for 'cigars and Italian wine'

The main content relates to the business that would take place between an editor and his writers.

However, after the first letter Wilde continually invites Vian to visit him: "Will be at home tomorrow afternoon, so glad if you come down for tea.

"We must have an Evening together soon over our journalism article."

In the final letter Wilde goes to great lengths to encourage a meeting.

"Come and dine at Pagani's in Portland Street on Friday 7.30pm. No dress, just ourselves and a flask of Italian wine.

"Afterwards we will smoke cigarettes and Talk over the Journalistic article, could we go to your rooms, I am so far off, and clubs are difficult to Talk in."

"Till Thursday night. This is all wrong, isn't it. Truly yours, Oscar Wilde"

The small but revealing group of letters sent are to be sold by Fine Art Auctioneers Bamfords of Derby on the September 24.

Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde was born in 1854 and after leaving Oxford Magdalene College seemed to lack direction in his career.

From 1886-89 he wrote for and edited Society Magazines.

In 1895 he was accused by the Marquess of Queensbury of corrupting his son, Lord Alfred Douglas.

Wilde sued and lost, the court declared that Queensbury's accusation was justified, 'true in substance and in fact'.

On May 25, 1895 Wilde and Alfred Taylor were convicted of gross indecency and sentenced to two years' hard labour.

Wilde was released on the 19 May 1897 and left England the next day for the continent never to return and to spend his last three years under the name Sebastian Melmoth.

His final address was the Hôtel d'Alsace in Paris and he died there of cerebral meningitis on 30 November 1900 aged 46.

Today fans from across the world come to visit his grave and statue in the Père Lachaise cemetery, in Paris.


Attached Files Thumbnail(s)
       

















































Reply
#36


Man, people sure do make a production over another's sexuality. No wonder so many choose to remain in the closet still. I don't see where much has changed other than they aren't sent to prison. Lives are still made to be so hellish that they choose to get out of Dodge & live in another area.

You come across some interesting stuff, LC, I never would have discovered that on my own or even stopped & taken the time to read it if I did. Thanks.
[Image: Zy3rKpW.png]
Reply
#37
I am presently reading "How to Win the Lottery and be Set for Life". It is from the "Self Help and
Investment" section of the Newstand.
Reply
#38
new, and sounds good~~

From Publishers Weekly
Readers who recognize Goldsworthy (How Rome Fell) as Britain's most prolific and perhaps finest popular historian of Roman times will find him once again at his best. Shakespeare and Hollywood portray Antony and Cleopatra as star-crossed lovers, but historians understand that Antony (83–30 B.C.E.) was Julius Caesar's right-hand man, ruthless and ambitious. Cleopatra (69–30 B.C.E.) was not Egyptian but Greek, descended from Ptolemy, whose family had ruled Egypt for three centuries. She became Caesar's mistress in 48 B.C.E. In the Roman civil war that followed Caesar's assassination four years later, Antony shared power with Caesar's adopted son, Octavian (later emperor Augustus), until they quarreled. Antony and Cleopatra first met in 41 B.C.E. and ruled Egypt together for three years until Octavian's invading armies approached, at which point they both committed suicide. Unlike many competing authors, Goldsworthy never disguises the scanty evidence for many historical events. Some of his best passages review surviving documents, discuss their biases, draw parallels from his vast knowledge of Roman history, and recount what probably happened unless, as he often admits in this thoughtful, deeply satisfying work, even speculation is impossible. Maps.


Attached Files
.jpg   20100917-102745-pic-809783135_s160x243.jpg (Size: 8.84 KB / Downloads: 79)

















































Reply
#39
I have at least 15 books opened and spread around the house but there are four that are closest to my reading area in my office. They are:

The Cambridge History of Warfare, Cambridge University Press
Art Under Dictatorship, Hellmutt Lehmann-Haupt, Oxford University Press
German Art in the Twentieth Century, Museum of Modern Art, New York
Twisted Paths: Europe 1914-1945 Oxford University Press

Stephen Hawking's new book "The Grand Design" just arrived the other day but I haven't had the chance to open it yet.
Fug duh kund
Reply
#40
(09-20-2010, 04:12 AM)Luke Warmwater Wrote: Stephen Hawking's new book "The Grand Design" just arrived the other day but I haven't had the chance to open it yet.


Larry King interviewed him last week. I don't normally comment on people with disabilities but, he's one creepy looking guy, creepy enough that I would quickly walk in the opposite direction if I saw him coming.


[Image: Zy3rKpW.png]
Reply