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The least sunspots since 1913
#1
The Sun is in a lowered sunspot activity phase longer than any other since 1913 when weather records were broken all over the world.

[url=https://www.perspectaweather.com/blog/2019/7/10/1230-pm-hottest-temperature-ever-recorded-on-earth-took-place-on-july-10th-1913-in-death-valley-california-a-year-with-many-amazing-weather-events][/url][/url][url=https://wattsupwiththat.com/2019/12/12/deep-solar-minimum-on-the-verge-of-an-historic-milestone/]easy read
Remember we're all in the same storm, just not in the same ship.
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#2
I don't know why the link looks like that but if you hit it it comes up.
Remember we're all in the same storm, just not in the same ship.
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#3
Maybe that is why I feel like hibernatng.
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#4
last time it happened death valley set a record of 134 deg that hasn't been broken since.
Remember we're all in the same storm, just not in the same ship.
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#5
Other crazy weather happened that year as well. Ask Greta what we should do.
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#6
Germans love death valley in the summer.
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#7
Thank you President Trump, you fixed the sun!
[Image: 625aa3b7e816e15fe35bbd2e8ae46390b3584aed...b15972.jpg]
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#8
(12-13-2019, 06:43 PM)Rootilda Wrote: Thank you President Trump, you fixed the sun!
And all he had to do to fix it was stare into the Sun during a solar eclipse. What a brave soul. Thank you for your sacrifice Captain Bonespurs.
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#9
I've never been more proud of our emperor god.
[Image: 625aa3b7e816e15fe35bbd2e8ae46390b3584aed...b15972.jpg]
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#10
The hatred runs deep Luke.
Remember we're all in the same storm, just not in the same ship.
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#11
(12-13-2019, 02:17 PM)Maggot Wrote: The Sun is in a lowered sunspot activity phase longer than any other since 1913 when weather records were broken all over the world.

[url=https://www.perspectaweather.com/blog/2019/7/10/1230-pm-hottest-temperature-ever-recorded-on-earth-took-place-on-july-10th-1913-in-death-valley-california-a-year-with-many-amazing-weather-events][/url][/url][url=https://wattsupwiththat.com/2019/12/12/deep-solar-minimum-on-the-verge-of-an-historic-milestone/]easy read

I followed 2 links from your post, I am not going to pretend to understand much of it-but in 1913-there was a day with temps at 134, the days surrounding it were just as hot, its not like one day it was 90, and the next 134. OMG-I mean it was like 129, 126, wtf hell?!
Wow
So what is the article saying about current temps?
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#12
You tell me.............
[Image: bunny-humps-balloon_zpsd1ebf71f.gif]
Remember we're all in the same storm, just not in the same ship.
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#13
The sun is currently in the midst of a deep solar minimum and it is about to reach an historic milestone. So far this year the sun has been blank (i.e., no visible sunspots) for 266 days and, barring any major surprises, it’ll reach 269 days early next week which will be the quietest year in terms of sunspots since 1913 when the sun was spotless for 311 days. In fact, the current stretch of consecutive spotless days has reached 29 and for the year the sun has been blank 77% of the time. The current record-holder in the satellite era for spotless days in a given year is 2008 when the sun was blank for 268 days making the 2008-2009 solar minimum the deepest since 1913.

Solar minimum is a normal part of the 11-year sunspot cycle, but the last one and the current one have been far deeper than most. One of the consequences of a solar minimum is a reduction of solar storms and another is the intensification of cosmic rays. The just ended solar cycle 24 turned out to be one of the weakest in more than a century – continuing a weakening trend that began in the 1980’s – and, if the latest forecasts are correct, the next solar cycle will be the weakest in more than 200 years.

The solar cycle is like a pendulum, swinging back and forth between periods of high and low sunspot number every 11 years or so. Researchers have been tracking solar cycles since they were discovered in the 19th century. The just ended solar cycle, #24, was the weakest with the fewest sunspots since solar cycle 14 peaked in February 1906. Solar cycle 24 continued a recent trend of weakening solar cycles which began with solar cycle 21 that peaked around 1980. The very latest forecast for the next solar cycle (#25) says it will be weaker than the just ended SC24 and perhaps the weakest of the last 200 years. To be fair, some earlier forecasts had the next solar cycle being in similar magnitude to SC24. However, research now underway has apparently found a more reliable method to predict space weather. The maximum of this next cycle – measured in terms of sunspot numbers, could be 30 to 50% lower than the most recent one – solar cycle 24 according to the latest forecast. The results of this new forecasting technique show that the next solar cycle will start in 2020 and reach its maximum in 2025.

The new forecast is the work of a team led by Irina Kitiashvili of the Bay Area Environmental Research Institute at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley, California. Using data collected since 1976 from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and the Solar Dynamics Observatory space missions, the researchers were able to come up with a prediction by directly observing the solar magnetic field rather than simply counting sunspots, which provides only a rough gauge of activity inside the Sun. Because this is a relatively new approach, there is only data from four complete cycles, but by combining three sources of solar observations with estimates of the Sun’s interior activity, the team was able to produce a prediction in 2008 that matched the activity that was observed over the past 11 years.

One challenge for researchers working to predict the Sun’s activities is that scientists do not yet completely understand the inner workings of our star. Some factors that play out deep inside the Sun cannot be measured directly. They have to be estimated from measurements of related phenomena on the solar surface like sunspots, coronal holes and filaments. Kitiashvili’s method differs from other prediction tools in terms of the raw material for its forecast. Previously, researchers used the number of sunspots to represent indirectly the activity of the solar magnetic field. The new approach takes advantage of direct observations of magnetic fields emerging on the surface of the Sun.
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#14
I love the side articles by the way
"Antitode for Greta"
"Angry highschool drop out chosen for Time Magazine person of the year"
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#15
And here I was thinking the pretty northern lights may not be so prevalent. Go figure.
Remember we're all in the same storm, just not in the same ship.
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#16
(12-13-2019, 06:19 PM)BigMark Wrote: Germans love death valley in the summer.
Even more than they love David Hasselhoff?
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#17
Don't be silly!
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#18
(12-14-2019, 10:55 AM)BigMark Wrote: Don't be silly!
Ok. I'll be sally instead. Fat sally.
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#19
She'll get fat when she stops smoking.
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#20
(12-15-2019, 09:43 AM)BigMark Wrote: She'll get fat when she stops smoking.
Nah. She'll lose weight. Won't be slurping so much protein.
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